Home Culture Nazareth | The Childhood hometown of Jesus


Nazareth | The Childhood hometown of Jesus

by Mackenzie Landi

Known as the childhood hometown of Jesus, Nazareth is nestled in the hills of the lower Galilee region and is an important site for pilgrims as well as tourists. Pronounced Natsrat in Hebrew, Nazareth is a city with a rich history and a vibrant culture, but it is perhaps best known as the place where Mary received the proclamation from the angel Gabriel that she would conceive a son by the power of the Holy Spirit.

The Church of the Annunciation in Nazareth commemorates when the angel Gabriel appeared to the Virgin Mary and told her she would supernaturally give birth to the Messiah.

Nazareth

The Grotto in the Church of the Annunciation in Nazareth is where it is believed the Virgin Mary had her encounter with the angel, Gabriel.

Nazareth

St Gabriel Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Nazareth, Israel, is located over an underground spring, which according to Eastern Orthodox belief, is where the Virgin Mary was drawing water at the time of the Annunciation. Water from the spring still runs inside the apse of the church and feeds the adjacent site of Mary’s Well, located 150 yards away.

Nazareth

Nazareth Village, an authentic recreation of life in the region as it would have been during the first century, features a shepherd watching his flock.

Nazareth

A carpenter at Nazareth Village demonstrating first-century woodworking techniques.

Nazareth

A weaver at Nazareth Village, demonstrating the making and dyeing of cloth using first-century techniques.

Nazareth

View from the top of Mount Precipice, also known as Mount Kedumim, located just outside the southern edge of Nazareth. It is believed by some to be the site of the rejection of Jesus described in the Gospel of Luke.

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Originally posted at israeladvantagetours.com

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